Take Ivy Off Trees

English ivy can Choke – and kill the beautiful trees that give our yards and neighborhoods shade and character. What looks like a lovely little green plant can actually strangle trees, accelerate rot, attract mosquitoes and cause mature trees to fall down during storms.

Ivy can strangle trees, and once it is in the tree canopy, it can block sunlight from the trees’ leaves. Dense ivy cover deprives the tree’s bark of normal contact with air and mocroorganisms and competes with the tree for nutrients and water. Ivy is a threat. But we can beat it with simple landscaping work.

3 Steps to Remove Ivy from Trees

  1. Use garden clippers to cut ivy at the bottom around the entire trunk of all infested trees. The goal is to separate all ivy vines from their source of nutrients in the soil so they will die. If the ivy is not dense, you can pull it from the soil at the bottom of the tree with your hands, especially the day after it rains.  On heavily infested trees with ivy vines thicker than an inch, you will need to carefully saw through the vine and carefully, gently ease it away from the bark.  Experiment with the tools below to find what works best for you.    TIP: Wear gloves and long sleeves to lessen the risk of poison ivy. Many prefer doing this during the winter months when poison ivy is less virulent, and they will have heavier clothing to reduce the risk. 
  2. Pull all ivy vines out of the ground around the base of the tree, making a 2 feet “life saver ring” around the tree. This will protect the tree from future infestations.  This is easiest to do when the soil is soft from rains; if the ground is very hard and the vines keep breaking, wait until after a rain to remove the vines.  The cleared space allows you to see any emerging ivy from roots you missed.  Arborists suggest laying a 2″ thick leaf or wood chip mulch for three feet around the tree to preserve moisture in the soil and keep lawn mowers from getting too close to the roots.  Keep the mulch 3″ away from tree trunk to ensure air exchange for the bark, and you can spot any ivy trying to reinfest the tree.
  3. Once cut, leave ivy on the tree. Do not pull it off because that could harm the tree. Ivy will gradually blend into the tree bark after it is cut.  Check up your tree each winter to be sure the ivy remains off.

Contact info@TreeStewards.org  to get a demonstration on how to remove ivy from a tree in your yard or to request a speaker. .

Additional Education Materials

Cover of poster about removing ivy from trees

Download 2-sided mini poster about ivy removal.

Download a PDF presentation to share.

Download a Slide presentation to share

These materials were developed for TreeStewards and Arlington Regional Master Naturalists under a grant from the Tree Canopy Fund of Arlington, Virginia. These materials, created by Biodiversity Project of Chicago, may be adapted and distributed by anyone who wants to protect their trees.

We’d like to know how the campaign is succeeding. Please notify us when you clear ivy from trees or is you are using the materials  in your work by emailing info@TreeStewards.org

8 Responses to Take Ivy Off Trees

  1. Kristine says:

    Thank you for the article. We just moved into a house in Ventura CA, and there is a beautiful flowering tree (unidentified at moment) that is strangled by ivy. The base of tree has very large old ivy vines around it and it is completely entangled above in the canopy. The tree is still flowering and seems healthy so I will work on it at base immediately, and over the next year I will gradually attempt to remove the dense vines above. Who knew you could get a rash from this type of ivy! Thank you for informing me. I removed some vines the other day and now wonder if the slight rash I have is from the ivy.

  2. Betsy says:

    Thank you for reminding us of the goal:right tree for right place, right garden for right place.

  3. I agree with DC Arborist. We’ve lost a great deal of canopy cover throughout the US. We can start at home by maintaining the old growth trees we have and adding trees where appropriate.

  4. Pingback: Red oak trees and English ivy « agarikat

  5. Pingback: Choking Hazard: English Ivy Removal Campaign | Master Gardeners of Northern Virginia

  6. d.c. alfisti says:

    Also, when thinking about ivy’s impact, also consider eliminating solid canopy cover so gardens can grow……..massive tree canopy prevents sustainable urban agriculture and healthy nutrient initiatives.
    Maintaining vegetable gardens and committing to dense canopy shade are divergent and contradictory objectives

    • DC Arborist says:

      Tree canopy and gardens do not have to be mutually exclusive. Just follow the rule: right tree for the right place, right garden for the right place.

  7. Pingback: Homeowners Urged to Remove Destructive Ivy from Trees | ARLnow.com

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